General Jean Pierre Lanabère


General of the Imperial Guard who was mortally wounded at Borodino



Born: December 24, 1770

Place of Birth: Salies-de-Béarn, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, France

Legion of Honor: Commander

Imperial Nobility: Baron

Died: September 16, 1812

Cause of Death: Mortally wounded

Place of Death: Mojaisk, Russia

Arc de Triomphe: LANABÈRE on the east pillar


Pronunciation:



The son of a notary and lawyer, Jean Pierre Lanabère was elected lieutenant in the 3rd Battalion of Volunteers of Basses-Pyrénées in October of 1791. In 1792 he was promoted to capitaine and he served in the Army of the South. The following year Lanabère took command of a company of chasseurs and he joined the Army of the Western Pyrenees. He remained with that army until September of 1795 when he joined the Army of the West. In 1800 Lanabère served with the Army of the Reserve in Chabran's division. He served at the crossing of the Ticino at Turbigo and then at the Battle of Marengo. A month later Lanabère received a promotion to chef de bataillon.

During the years of peace that followed, Lanabère served at the camp of Brest. In 1805 he embarked on the fleet of Belle-Isle and then in May of 1806 he joined the Chasseurs à Pied of the Imperial Guard. Lanabère served on the campaigns that followed and fought at major battles including Jena, Eylau, and Friedland. In 1808 he was named colonel-major of the 1st Fusiliers-Chasseurs of the Imperial Guard and a Knight of the Empire. After serving in Spain, in 1809 Lanabère took part in the Danube campaign and fought at the Battle of Aspern-Essling where he was wounded by a shot that shattered his right arm. In recognition of his services he was named a Commander of the Legion of Honor and then in 1810 a Baron of the Empire. Lanabère served in Spain in 1810 and then in 1811 he was promoted to général de brigade. For the Russian campaign of 1812, Lanabère took command of the 2nd Brigade of the 2nd Division of the Young Guard. During the Battle of Borodino, General Morand was wounded and out of action and Lanabère was ordered to take command of Morand's division. Lanabère took command of the division and then was also wounded, but much worse than Morand. He died from his wounds nine days later.


Bibliography


Updated March 2018

© Nathan D. Jensen