General Charles-Stanislas Marion


Charles-Stanislas Marion Général de brigade who was killed at Borodino



Born: May 7, 1758

Place of Birth: Charmes, Vosges, France

Legion of Honor: Officer

Imperial Nobility: Baron

Died: September 7, 1812

Cause of Death: Killed in action

Place of Death: Borodino, Russia

Arc de Triomphe: MARION on the east pillar




Charles Stanislas Marion began his military career by enlisting in a regiment of the King's infantry at age 18. In November of 1789 he obtained permission to quit his regiment and on the same day he joined the National Guard of Charmes as a capitaine. Two years later Marion joined the 4th Battalion of Volunteers of Vosges. Over the next few years he would serve with the Army of the Rhine, taking his first wound at Rheinturckheim on March 30th, 1793, when he was wounded by a saber blow to the right arm. In October of 1795 Captain Marion was promoted to chef de batallion and placed with the 21st Light Demi-Brigade. A month later he was taken prisoner at Mannheim, and he would remain a prisoner of war until June of 1796.

Marion rejoined the 21st Light Demi-Brigade in January of 1797 and he served with them in Italy. That April he joined the 93rd Ligne and then became very active in the fighting of 1799, serving at Pastrengo, San Giuliano, Bassignano, la Trebbia, and Novi . A month after Novi he was promoted to chef de brigade of the 93rd Line. The next year, Marion was serving at the fort of Savona during the Siege of Genoa and was captured when the fort fell on May 16th, 1800. He was released from captivity that October.

During the peaceful years that followed, Marion first served with the Corps of Observation of the Gironde before serving in garrison at Périgeueux. In 1803 he was named colonel of the 24th Light and employed at the Camp of Saint-Omer, and in 1804 he was named an Officer of the Legion of Honor. As war broke out in 1805, Marion was promoted to général de brigade and took command of the arsenal at Plaisance.

In 1808, General Marion became commander of the Pyrénées-Orientales département. The next year he was ordered to form infantry battalions at Perpignan, which he did and then conducted them first to Strasbourg and then to the Army of Germany in April. On May 27th, Marion took command of the 1st Brigade of Grandjean's division. After the conclusion of the campaign of 1809, he was sent to the camp of Boulogne.

Marion was created a Baron of the Empire in September of 1810. In 1812, as the army was gearing up for the campaign in Russia, Marion received command of the 2nd Brigade of Ledru's division in Ney's III Corps. He served throughout Russia, but was killed at Borodino.


Bibliography


Updated May 2014

© Nathan D. Jensen