General Jean-Joseph Guieu


General who commanded a brigade through much of the Italian campaign of 1796



Born: September 30, 1758

Place of Birth: Champcella, Hautes-Alpes, France

Died: October 5, 1817

Place of Death: Châteauroux, France

Arc de Triomphe: GUYEUX on the south pillar




A career soldier, Jean-Joseph Guieu first enlisted in the artillery regiment of Toul in 1774 at age sixteen. In 1780 he obtained permission to leave the military and he didn't return until the Revolution arrived. In December of 1791 Guieu joined the 1st Battalion of Volunteers of Hautes-Alpes as a capitaine and six months later he was named a lieutenant-colonel of that battalion. In October of 1793 Guieu was promoted to chef de brigade and fought at Utelle, and then at the end of the year he was sent to the Army of the Eastern Pyrenees and promoted to général de brigade.

The spring of 1794 saw Guieu being given a command in Augereau's division, and that May he served at both battles of Saint-Laurent de la Mouga. The next month he fought at Llobrégat where he was wounded and then in August he again fought at Saint-Laurent de la Mouga. That November Guieu commanded the 1st Brigade of Augereau's division at the Battle of Montagne Noire .

Guieu and his men were next sent to the Army of Italy where an eager General Bonaparte took command in March of 1796. During the campaign in Italy that followed, Guieu served at Saint-Michel and Mondovi in April before then joining Sérurier's division. That July he transferred to Sauret's division and then fought at Salo on July 29th, where he and a battalion were trapped in a building. Without any food, he and his men resisted the Austrians until the 31st when Sauret was able to come to their rescue. The next month Guieu joined Vaubois' division and then in November he seized Saint-Michel and was sent to Verona with reinforcements. In mid-November Guieu rejoined Augereau's division just in time to take part in the Battle of Arcola , and the next month he was promoted to général de division. January of 1797 saw Guieu beaten by Provera at Anghiari, and then in February he took command of Augereau's division while Augereau was absent. That March he went on to cross the Piave, win at Sacile, served at the crossing of the Tagliamento, and then took Palmanova and Chiusa-di-Pletz.

At the end of 1797 Guieu took command of the newly created 9th Division in the Army of Italy, and he held this command for the next two years. In 1803 he retired from military service.


Bibliography


Updated May 2014

© Nathan D. Jensen